The Societal Implications of Lanham Act of 1946

The Societal Implications of Lanham Act of 1946

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The Societal Implications of Lanham Act of 1946
As development and advancement in technology become more readily available to the public, trademarking has become the key to marketing and advertisement in the United States. Every viable type of media, be it TV, radio, magazines, newspapers, and the Internet, all have become flooded with some type of advertisement or trademarking ploy. 
Now, more so than ever, products brand names and trademarks are solely associated with that particular product. Trademarking has become a crucial necessity in terms of viable success in the commercial world for products and commercial goods. A successful trademark is the cornerstone of company's product.
Currently, trademarking is even more protected and safely guarded by law, for lawmakers have realize how important trademarks have become for commercial and economical success. Trademark law has become the safeguard for the well-being of many companies and industries, and will constantly employ its defense to ensure that their intellectual property remains unharmed, unmarred, and un-infringed. 
The Lanham Act is the main trademark law that allows many companies to protect their trademarking practices and their products from those seeking to take advantage of their success. Companies such as Coca-Cola, McDonald's, and Apple, all have trademarking aspects that have become synonymous with their corporations, and at times, even more recognizable than the products or consumer goods they offer. The shape of the Coca-Cola bottle, the double arches, and the apple symbol are internationally recognizable, and each symbol is closely associated with their parent companies.
Society and the public equate trademarks with their brand names, and more specifically, with a certain standard of quality and reliability. It would be impossible to quantify the amount of times a consumer will decidedly choose to purchase a product with a recognizable trademark, such as Kellog's Corn Flakes, over a generic brand, such as a supermarket's brand for the same product. It is often done simply because the brand name establishes a certain relationship to quality, regardless of the difference in price. 
Trademark law has arguably become more important than the product itself, for society will seek to purchase widely recognized products because of their trademarks, even if the same product exists under a different brand name or trademark. The Lanham Act provisions on trademark law infringement have made it possible for companies to greatly rely on the strength of their trademarks for commercial success, knowing that federal trademark law protects them from others seeking to take advantage or exploit their trademarks for their own personal gain.

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